A little on process

A wise potter once told me (and a class of other workshop attendees) to always have works in progress waiting for you in the studio, it will be sure to get you in to work the next day and everyday.  I try to keep this in mind.  Even with a few weeks away with the family over the holidays, a great time to hit the reset button, allow clay works to dry out, clean the slate, rearrange, and start fresh, I have paintings in progress, tea sets waiting for their cups, sewing projects cut and ready to be finished, and clay sculptures in mind for my return.Watch Full Movie Online Streaming Online and Download

Rarely do I have a sculpture project I can complete from start to finish in one day.  More complex forms, like independent arms, or forms that have a more dramatic bend in the body, require drying time to harden with the right amount of integrity to support the piece.  Thanks to the dry high desert climate, things can dry a little faster here in Taos, than, say in the Everglades, but it’s a fine line.  Let your work dry too much and you don’t have the freedom to reshape a portion you may not be happy with later.  With clay we have a wonderful material that we can allow to dry and rewet later, and a myriad of options when it comes to working the material at various stages, but there is a certain amount of timing and understanding that comes with experience to work in this medium.

People often ask, “how long did it take you to make that?”  I know they want to know how long it took to sculpt, or form a single piece, not considering drying time, multiple firings, and finish work, but even with that in mind, most laymen don’t consider the development of an idea, the experimentation, the trial and error of learning the craft, nor the pulling together of thoughts and ideas that will later defend our works in artist statements and hopefully posterity.  Some peers even answer by saying it took them their whole lives to make that piece, and in a sense, it did!